research

I began my undergrad program at Florida State University with dreams of grad school. After consulting faculty about PhD programs, I scrambled to join labs and wiggled myself into three. I began my research journey working with Dr. Walter Boot on attention and visual search, Dr. Colleen Kelley on retrieval during directed forgetting, and Dr. Michael Kaschak on structural priming in language.

Post graduation, I was a lab coordinator for Dr. Arielle Borovsky’s lab, where I oversaw a longitudinal study investigating how the lexico-semantic network predicts vocabulary learning and language outcomes in infants (18 months - 2 years).

After working with Dr. Borovsky, I began a Cognitive Psychology PhD program at Florida State working with Dr. Michael Kaschak in the Language, Learning, and Memory Lab. My work in this lab examines language production and linguistic alignment. Under his mentoring, I’ve published four articles, three of which are first author papers.

I have also worked with the wonderful Dr. Rachel Ostrand over at IBM, investigating how spontaneous speech production may predict current and future dementia status in older adults.

Currently, I am supervising undergraduates in the Language, Learning, and Memory lab. I am responsible for the conceptualization of research projects, data analysis, research design, and general mentorship.

publications in peer reviewed journals

Chia, K. and Kaschak, M.P. Structural priming in question-answer dialogues. Psychon Bull Rev (2021). DOI

Long, M., Chia, K., & Kaschak, M. P. Pointing to the Future of Language Research. Journal of cognition, 4(1), 41. (2021) DOI

Chia, K., Hetzel-Ebben, H., Adolph, M. et al. Examining the factors that affect structural repetition in question answering. Mem Cogn 48, 1046–1060 (2020). DOI

Chia, K., Axelrod, C., Johnson, C. et al. Structural Repetition in Question Answering: A Replication and Extension of Levelt and Kelter (1982), Discourse Processes, 56:1, 2-23 (2019). DOI

publications under review

Chia, K. and Kaschak, M.P. It’s Not You, It’s Me: Some Speakers Elicit Structural Priming More Reliably than Others.

Chia, K., Edwards, A.A., Schatschneider, C., and Kaschak, M.P. Structural Repetition in Responses to Indirect Requests.